The Famous Voyage of Sir Francis Drake
 Comic Strip
The Famous Voyage of Sir Francis Drake
 Comic Strip
The Famous Voyage of Sir Francis Drake
 Comic Strip
The Famous Voyage of Sir Francis Drake
 Comic Strip

The Famous Voyage of Sir Francis Drake

Publication Date: January 11, 2011

Chapter: English Literature in the Sixteenth Century

Wah-wah-waaaaaaaaah...

Anyway, terrible jokes aside, this is the famous Sir Francis Drake, he who was like, "Hell, we've gone this far already. Might as well go 'round the horn." I'm pretty sure he also coined, "We are so lost." When he landed just north of present day San Francisco, the natives - according to the text in the Norton - gave him "feathers and cauls of net-work." Thanks, natives. Those'll come in real handy in the freezing cold voyage back around your God forsaken wasteland of a coastline (soon to be known as "California.") "The coldest winter I ever spent was a summer in San Francisco," indeed.*

Our primary knowledge of Drake's voyage comes form the text of Richard Hakluyt who, as you may recall, famously wrote, "A Particuler Discourse Concerninge the Greate Necessitie and Manifolde Commodyties That Are Like to Growe to This Realme of Englande by the Westerne Discoueries Lately Attempted, Written in the Yere 1584," and "The Principall Navigations, Voiages, and Discoveries of the English Nation: Made by Sea or Over Land to the Most Remote and Farthest Distant Quarters of the Earth at Any Time within the Compasse of These 1500 Years: Divided into Three Several Parts According to the Positions of the Regions Whereunto They Were Directed; the First Containing the Personall Travels of the English unto Ind a, Syria, Arabia ... the Second, Comprehending the Worthy Discoveries of the English Towards the North and Northeast by Sea, as of Lapland ... the Third and Last, Including the English Valiant Attempts in Searching Almost all the Corners of the Vaste and New World of America ... Whereunto is Added the Last Most Renowned English Navigation Round About the Whole Globe of the Earth," which I hear was a real barnburner.

* And yes, I know that Twain quote is apocryphal. I don't really care.

Author: Richard Hakluyt • Year: 1589 • Info: Wikipedia

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About The Comic

Lit Brick is a comic started by John S. Troutman in an effort to read the entire Norton Anthology of English Literature. Having eventually succeeded in that goal, it now features comics about all manner of random literature. And yeah, they're all pretty dumb.

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