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Don Quixote (1 of 3)

Publication Date: October 9, 2010

Chapter: Random Literature

I was commissioned to do three strips on "Don Quixote" by a friend of mine, then forgot about it for over a month. Whoops. Anyway, strip number one is today, and strips two and three will be Monday and Tuesday. "But, John! Those are normal Lit Brick days!" Well, yes, they are. But I don't want strips about the same topic being split up in the archives. So I'm gonna post the other two premium strips on Monday and Tuesday, then just run normal strips over next Saturday and Sunday so no time is lost. At least, that seems to make sense in my head. There won't, however, be a bonus strip tomorrow, simply because I won't have time to draw it. So yeah, see ya Monday.

Now, then "Don Quixote" is a massive tome, so three strips about it was a fairly tall order. While today's strip may seem rather unrelated (other than the reference to the play), it'll make more sense when the next couple of strips roll around.

Also, if it wasn't already fairly obvious, I've become far more interested in drawing Molly than in drawing the comics Molly is supposed to be drawing herself. Oh sure, I still go back to Molly's art style every now and then, but more and more of the strips have focused on the present instead of the past. I've found that relating the ancient literature to modern life is far more engaging, and often a bit more creative. I've also found that telling Molly's story is more fun than just retelling the stories of dead poets. Which is to say, while I'm sure we'll continue to see the "Lit Brick" that Molly draws herself, we'll probably be seeing Molly's real life a bit more frequently.

With that in mind, you get mini-storylines like what's beginning today and going for three strips: how Deirdre met Molly. It's actually an interesting challenge from a writing standpoint to tell the little story I want to tell while simultaneously relating it to the topic at hand. In this case, I had to figure out how to sandwich the girls' first meeting together with "Don Quixote." It proved easier than you might think, as you'll see on Monday.

Author: Miguel de Cervantes • Year: 1605 • Info: Wikipedia

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